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Date

15th & 16th October 2017

BRISBANE CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTRE

Grey Street, South Brisbane, 4101

Early bird closes

3rd September 2017

Conference Program Now Available!

Keynote Speakers

Emeritus Professor Judy Atkinson is a Jiman (central west Queensland) and Bundjalung (northern New South Wales) woman, with Anglo-Celtic and German heritage. Her academic contributions to the understanding of trauma related issues stemming from the violence of colonisation and the healing/recovery of Indigenous peoples from such trauma has won her the Carrick Neville Bonner Award in 2006 for her curriculum development and innovative teaching practice. In 2011 she was awarded the Fritz Redlick Memorial Award for Human Rights and Mental Health from the Harvard University program for refugee trauma. Her book ‘Trauma Trails – Recreating Songlines: The transgenerational effects of trauma in Indigenous Australia’, provides context to the life stories of people who have been moved from their country in a process that has created trauma trails, and the changes that can occur in the lives of people as they make connection with each other and share their stories of healing. She is a member of the Harvard Global Mental Health Scientific Research Alliance. She presently serves on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Scientific Advisory Committee on Closing the Gap research, and is on the Board of Directors of the Aboriginal and Torres Stait Islander Healing Foundation and sits on both the Education and Training Advisory Committee, and the Research Advisory Committee. She is the Patron of the We Al-li Trust.

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Michael Gregory is Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and a Member of the Faculty at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He teaches and practices law as part of the Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative (TLPI). TLPI is a partnership between Harvard Law School and Massachusetts Advocates for Children, a non-profit child advocacy organization in Boston. TLPI’s mission is to ensure that children traumatized by exposure to violence succeed in school. At HLS, Gregory co-teaches the Education Law Clinic, which has two components: law students in the Individual Advocacy component represent families of traumatized children in the special education system; students in the Legislative Lawyering component learn and practice the skills of lobbying and policy advocacy to advance TLPI’s public policy agenda for trauma-sensitive schools. As a result of TLPI’s advocacy, Massachusetts enacted the Safe and Supportive Schools Framework statute in 2014, a first-of-its-kind law that creates a statewide infrastructure that supports schools and districts to create safe and supportive whole-school learning environments that serve as a foundation for all students to succeed. With his colleagues at TLPI, Gregory is co-author of the project’s two landmark publications Helping Traumatized Children Learn, Volumes 1 and 2, and he also writes in the field of special education law. Gregory has taught courses in Education Law and Policy, Education Reform and School Culture, and Education Reform Movements. Gregory received his JD from Harvard Law School in 2004, graduating cum laude. He graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in American Civilization from Brown University in 1998, and received a Master of Arts in Teaching, also from Brown, in 1999. Gregory began his law career as a Skadden Fellow.

Phil Riley researches the overlap of psychology, education and leadership, with a particular focus on the lives of school leaders. Prior to joining ACU Phil was course leader for all post-graduate leadership programs in the Faculty of Education at Monash University. He has collaborated on more than 150 publications and peer reviewed conference presentations and been awarded over $3 million in research funding. Phil’s research applying adult attachment theory to the relationship between teachers, students and school leaders was showcased in The International Handbook of Research on Teachers and Teaching (Norwell, Massachusetts: Springer) Attachment Theory and the Teacher-Student Relationship (London: Routledge).

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Pamela Snow is a Professor and Head of the Rural Health School at the Bendigo campus of La Trobe University. Pamela has taught a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate health professionals and also has experience in teacher education. Pamela is a registered psychologist, having qualified originally in speech pathology. Her research has been funded by nationally competitive schemes such as the ARC Discovery Program, ARC Linkage Program, and the Criminology Research Council, and spans various aspects of risk in childhood and adolescence:

  • the oral language skills of high-risk young people (youth offenders and those in the state care system), and the role of oral language competence as an academic and mental health protective factor in childhood and adolescence;
  • applying evidence in the language-to-literacy transition in the early years of school;
  • linguistic aspects of investigative interviewing with children / adolescents as witnesses, suspects, victims in criminal investigations

Pamela has research links with the education, welfare and justice sectors, and her research has been published in a wide range of international journals. She is frequently called upon to address education, health, welfare, and forensic audiences. She is a Fellow of the Speech Pathology Association of Australia and is a past Victorian State Chair of the Australian Psychological Society. She has over 120 publications, comprising refereed papers, book chapters, monographs and research reports.

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Judith is currently a senior lecturer with the Queensland University of Technology after an extensive career with state schooling in Queensland.  She has worked as a teacher, guidance counsellor, and behaviour support specialist.  She has held both regional and state positions with the Queensland Department of Education and Training overseeing policy development and implementation, staff development, school, student and family support programs (all in the area of student behaviour management and support).  Judith oversees pre-service teacher education at QUT, regarding student behaviour support and classroom management and (more recently) trauma-informed schooling.  Judith’s main research interests include the impact of complex trauma on the developing child, primary and secondary school behaviours, and the well-being and resiliency of educators.  She is currently involved in a research project investigating the requirements for a state-wide framework for trauma-informed schooling. Through her research, training seminars and consultancy with educators, she continues to encourage schools to adopt a neuroscience informed approach to the behaviour management of trauma surviving students.  She is the author of the popular teacher resource/book: “Distressed or Deliberately Defiant: Managing Challenging Student Behaviour due to Trauma and Disorganised Attachment”.

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